Tag Archives: spirituality

Commitment to Personal Growth

We are physical, intellectual, emotional, and spiritual beings. Personal growth happens without our placing a strong commitment to our own growth. We humans tend to let things happen, react, and learn.

Physical  –  Physical growth is taken for granted. We mature in our late teens/early twenties. Done deal. However, a commitment to physical growth as an adult becomes a commitment to health and fitness.

Intellectual – We do pursue education enough to become employed and devote attention to training needed to do our job. However, a commitment to intellectual growth becomes a pursuit of a broader wisdom and a deeper understanding of mother nature and human nature.

Emotionally – We find ourselves able to generally become an emotional adult versus feeling and displaying the emotions of a five year old. However, a commitment to emotional growth is a commitment to improve self-control, patience, love, integrity, and our peacemaking skills. 

Spiritually – Most of us believe God and heaven do exist. We may discover a time when we want to know more. If not yet a longing, a commitment to spiritual growth is to strive to tap our inner self, beyond just using our intellect. We develop our heart, intuition, peace of mind, and more.

A commitment to personal growth requires a commitment to a growing understanding of humility. 

What have I learned? What have I discovered? How can I grow? These are question we can ask ourselves at the end of each day, each week, each month, each year, and each decade.

We will have discovered on our joyful pursuit of happiness that a commitment to personal growth is difficult to maintain and difficult to feel great success in one day, one week, or one month. Over a decade, with great humility, we will have discovered a tremendous sense of personal accomplishment.

Commitment to Family

A strong sense of commitment is the foundation for a strong, fully-functional family. The commitment of each family member includes:

  • Giving heartfelt appreciation to family members when deserved
  • Spending time together
  • Showing affection
  • Constructively solving problems using compromise, boundaries, and agreements
  • Communicating completely to understanding
  • Managing stress and crises with a focus on learning lessons of life and having faith in the future
  • Developing and honoring a set of family principles
  • Nurturing a “yes” attitude
  • Using internal and external people, tools, and information for addressing the present and planning for the future.

The approach to commitment is best viewed as a commitment to helping each family member to grow physically, intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually; including oneself and the family unit as a whole.

As adults, we will have discovered on our joyful pursuit of happiness the paramount commitment becomes growing emotionally and spiritually and helping all family members to grow emotionally and spiritually, without condition.

Commitment to Marriage

Divorce rates show how strong the commitment to marriage is consistent with ’til death do us part.’ Are there reasons to divorce? Yes. It is our responsible choice whether the grounds are severe and dangerous behaviors or are the frustrating behaviors of every day life.

Commitment to marriage is not a commitment to erotic attraction ’til death do us part.’ Commitment to marriage is not a commitment to agreement on everything ’til death do us part.’ Commitment to marriage is not a commitment to staying only if our spouse does not change ’til death do us part.’ Commitment to marriage is not a commitment as long as our spouse changes to our satisfaction ’til death do us part.’ Commitment to marriage is not a commitment to avoid conflict ’til death do us part.’

We will have discovered marriage is a commitment to help our spouse grow emotionally and spiritually and a commitment to ourself to grow emotionally and spiritually with our spouse……….’til death do us part’……no matter what.

Goals and Problems

Asked to choose their generation’s top goals from among five options, 18 to 24 year-olds listed these as either most important or second most important:

  • To get rich                                              81%
  • To be famous                                         51%
  • To help pe0ple who need help            30%
  • To be leaders in their community      22%
  • To become more spiritual                    10%

They also said their most important individual problem is:

  • Money/debt                                           30%
  • College/education                                  18%
  • Career/job                                               16%
  • Family/relationships                               7%
  • Health                                                        2%
  • National/Int’l conditions                         2%
  • All other (including don’t know)          29%

Hmmm! Quite an indication of the character of today’s youth!

Happy Easter!

Source: Pew Research Center 2006 Generation Next Survey