Tag Archives: attitude

Commitment to Family

A strong sense of commitment is the foundation for a strong, fully-functional family. The commitment of each family member includes:

  • Giving heartfelt appreciation to family members when deserved
  • Spending time together
  • Showing affection
  • Constructively solving problems using compromise, boundaries, and agreements
  • Communicating completely to understanding
  • Managing stress and crises with a focus on learning lessons of life and having faith in the future
  • Developing and honoring a set of family principles
  • Nurturing a “yes” attitude
  • Using internal and external people, tools, and information for addressing the present and planning for the future.

The approach to commitment is best viewed as a commitment to helping each family member to grow physically, intellectually, emotionally, and spiritually; including oneself and the family unit as a whole.

As adults, we will have discovered on our joyful pursuit of happiness the paramount commitment becomes growing emotionally and spiritually and helping all family members to grow emotionally and spiritually, without condition.

Attitude of Kindness

That person is the kindest person I have ever known.

It is difficult to discover on our joyful pursuit of happiness a better feeling about another human being. If we commit to this destination for ourselves, it starts with an attitude of kindness.

Kindness Quote

A OneRoad Traveled Roadsign 

 

Wherever there is a human being, there is an opportunity for kindness.

                              Seneca

Attitudes about Self

Truly loving oneself connects with a number of attitudes about self. Three very important examples are: 

Self Confidence – confidence in oneself and in one’s powers and abilities.

Self Respect – due respect for oneself, one’s character, and one’s conduct.

Self Control – restraint exercised over one’s own impulses, emotions, or desires.

Feeling the right way about oneself does not require appoval from others. We find we may be tempted to equate being lovable with the sense of being loved by others. Rather, we will have discovered we must develop the attitude within that we are worthy of respect and love, even with our imperfections and our critics.

Self Image – The conception that one has of oneself, including an assessment of qualities and personal worth. (This definition is clearly neutral) 

Self Worth – Pride in oneself; self-respect. (Self-worth can be a confusing term. Watch out for pride)

Our perception of self can get out of control on our journey. Out of control self-image becomes self-centeredness. Self-centeredness is usually based on a denial and cover-up of low attitudes about self.

Self-Esteem is a word that has gained much attention in recent years and has confused many. Low self-esteem and high self-esteem are presented as an “either/or” – low is bad and high is good. That is the basis of the confusion. Healthy self-esteem is a better description of one who has the best attitudes about self.

Pride in oneself is an attitude that can become out of control. Too much pride in oneself leads to a “better than everyone else” attitude. We will have discovered on our joyful pursuit of happines excessive pride can lead to lethal attitudes about self and is the First of the Seven Deadly Sins.

Selfish Attitudes

Attitudes about self are possibly the most critical aspect of our joyful pursuit of happiness. There is a clear danger with going too far with our self image.

Self righteous – Piously sure of one’s own righteousness; moralistic. Exhibiting pious self-assurance.

Self centered – Engrossed in oneself and one’s own affairs; selfish

Self deception – The act of deceiving oneself or the state of being deceived by oneself.

We will have discovered it is best not to go there. This path sends us on a journey of unhappiness at best, probably high anxiety, and possibly even tragedy. This is a very big deal. The key to developing our self image is to constantly strive for a growing understanding of pride and humility.